Infograph and Infographs image via Schrockguide.

Infograph and Infographs image via Schrockguide.

With bad results from our first try with the resume infographs, this is a great opportunity to improve and show that we can learn from our mistakes. Below is a compiled list of dos and don’ts from Thursday’s class:

Infographs Dos and Don’ts

1) Tenses: Using “his” or “her” when listing your skills can look more professional than using “my” but regardless of what tense you use, keep it consistent.

2) Understandable at a glance: Be sure to use a format that is simple to read with short bullet points and an easy to follow line of information. Find out how to convince an employer of your skills by clicking here.

3) Hyperlinks: If this option is available on your chosen infographs site, link out to more information about yourself. Though, be sure each of the links work before finalizing your assignment.

4) Images: To keep your infographs from being wordy, break it up with icons and PNG (blank background) images.

5) Wordiness: Every word counts. You still want a lot of information available, but act as if it costs $5 a word.

6) LinkedIn: Paste the link to your profile so that a potential employer can access more information about you.

7) Focus: Since this assignment is for Advanced Social Media, be sure that the main focus is on your social media skills and personal reach on various social media sites.

8) Spelling: Be sure to have a friend look over for spelling mistakes. If you’re able to finish this assignment in advance of the due date, set it aside and come back to look over for spelling and grammar errors.

9) Filler: Don’t busy up your infographs with high school information. College education and your certificates are of most importance.

Five Second Rule

Image via Pusheen.Tumblr.

Image via Pusheen.Tumblr.

According to Ike Brunner, we have five seconds to “wow” our potential employer with a visual graphic like this. Use this to your advantage with the overall design, opening area and format. Here’s a video about the effectiveness of infographs.

Questions

1) Which parts of your infograph did you immediately think about changing once we were told how bad they were?

2) Whose infograph were you impressed with (if even just a certain part)? Which part?

3) Do you feel more confident in the assignment now that we’ve had a test-run?

25 thoughts on “Infographs: Wowing Your Potential Employer

  • February 15, 2016 at 6:55 pm
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    These tips are helpful and really well organized, Olivia! So, when I made my first attempt at an infographic last week, I was uncertain as to how Dr. Ike and Russ would critique it. I think we can all agree that infographic attempt round one did not go according to plan. I made some crucial mistakes that I will be correcting with my second infographic design.

    I spent about two and a half hours creating my first design using Canva. I chose Canva to make my infographic because I am already fairly familiar with the platform from creating social media graphics for work. After hearing Ike and Russ’s feedback, I realized that I needed to essentially redesign the majority of my infographic. My design had far too many words and not enough graphics to tell my story. Making infographics is no joke…it takes a long time to envision the design, look for the proper icons, and place everything aesthetically on the page. I am currently making edits to my second attempt by showcasing numerical results from the digital media positions I have already been a part of, certifications, platforms, etc. I feel more confident than the first attempt, but it’s still taking me a pretty long time to create the new infographic. I hope that this attempt is more eye-catching than the first for class on Thursday.

    Reply
    • February 16, 2016 at 6:28 pm
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      Agreed! A lot of patience and care is required to make a evenly formatted infograph, especially if it is standing in between you and a potential dream job. The more eye-catching and clear we can make them, the higher the grade (hopefully).

      Reply
  • February 15, 2016 at 8:17 pm
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    This is all great advice! I think if we follow your suggestions, we’ll all do well on the assignment. After the last class I felt better understanding that we were applying for a social media job. I’m not sure how I missed that, but it’s not the first time. I Liked Abby’s infographic, and I wanted to change my formatting to apply for a social media job.

    Your blog is informative, flows nicely and full of value. Great job!

    Reply
    • February 16, 2016 at 6:31 pm
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      Thank you! I noticed that many of our classmates collectively said, “Oh!” when it was mentioned that this was to be geared towards a social media job. Hopefully we’re able to take the skills we each currently have and create a great visualization of our resume.

      Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 10:49 pm
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      Thanks, Denny!

      Reply
  • February 15, 2016 at 8:59 pm
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    In class on Thursday I realized that we had the wrong idea when trying to create our resume inforgraphs. Something that I wanted to change right away was the way I set up my infograph. I didn’t like the way I had a timeline set up. Although I was a little confused on what exactly Ike and Russ wanted I tried to do my best creating it. When it comes down to my second attempt I think I’m going to include more of a Social Media perspective on it. That’s really the main part of my infograph I want to fix. Along with taking away the high school information and the microsoft office skills.

    I do feel more confident the second time around but I am worried that my infograph won’t look as appealing since I don’t hold any current social media jobs or internships. I’m going to try and make it more visually stimulating though. With all the examples that I’ve looked at online it looks like they’re all very detailed and catches the eye. I hope the second time around that we all make positive improvements to our infographs.

    Reply
    • February 16, 2016 at 6:49 pm
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      It seems to be the general consensus that we weren’t aware that this was social media specific. Regardless of how this issue came about, it’s clear that this is at the top of everyone’s to-do list for the second round. Try adding information from your digital hub project, any personal blogs you may have (the reach you have obtained) and so on. This serves as social media experience without being an actual paid position.

      Reply
  • February 16, 2016 at 10:48 am
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    This blog post was really helpful. When I looked at my infographic I wanted to change all of the format of my infographic, the color was really distracting and I felt like I didn’t emphasized on my skills enough. I know I am going to emphasize on my skills set better on the redo and most likely changed the format of my infographic to less busy colors so the employer won’t get distracted.

    I am definitely more confident since we get a redo because I know what employers are looking for. I was impressed with abby’s because it was not to busy it was simple and to the point.

    Reply
    • February 16, 2016 at 6:55 pm
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      Try using complimentary colors that are considered “warm” with some blacks, greys and navy. These are professional and much easier on the eyes. You could also look at some examples on Google Image Search to see what color they opted for.

      Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 10:51 pm
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      Thanks, Stacy! We used the same template so it should be easy to add on/refine yours if you need to :]

      Reply
  • February 16, 2016 at 4:08 pm
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    The entire layout of my infographic and all the wordiness was the first thing I immediately thought about changing once we were told how bad our infographs were. I was impressed with Abby’s inforgraphic overall because of how clean it was and the relevant information on there.

    I do feel more comfortable in the assignment because of the better clarification of what Ike and Russ wants. Also this post was very helpful so I’m definitely going to take a lot of these tips in to consideration.

    Reply
    • February 16, 2016 at 6:57 pm
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      I also felt mine was very wordy and disorganized. Now that we are all clear on the assignment, it does seem like we will all improve on this second try.
      Thank you for using the tips in your redo infograph!

      Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 10:51 pm
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      Thanks, Brooke!

      Reply
  • February 16, 2016 at 8:11 pm
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    You did a great job at covering all the tips we went over in class! Going into the infographic assignment I definitely didn’t expect it to take as long as it did. I should have paid better attention to directions the first time around but after going through them in class I felt like I had a better grasp of what was being expected of us. Originally I made my infographic without a template but after looking at others in class I felt like it’d be more beneficial to me to use one. As everyone else mentioned, I think Abby did a great job on the assignment. After getting comfortable using the tools necessary to make an infographic, I think I will be more confident in making a second one.

    Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 11:03 am
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      Thank you! It’s good that we’re getting a trial-run of this kind of task before one of us might one day be asked to submit one for employment. Templates are a great help as you can still edit and adjust them as necessary so that it reflects your resume well.

      Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 10:53 pm
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      Thanks, Maranda! I was impressed that you created yours from scratch!

      Reply
  • February 17, 2016 at 11:58 am
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    Awesome, thanks for all these tips, they were super helpful.

    The main thing I wanted to change after going over them on Thursday was that I felt like I didn’t expand enough on certain things. I kind of left my pretty bare bones which would leave it up to the employer to ask me to expand on it.

    One of the tips I really focused on when redoing my infographic was the usage of hyperlinks. My new, updated version has almost every single thing link to something. For example, all the check marks next to my skill section link to an example of that skill and the picture preview of the website I designed links to the actual website.

    I think this is a great tip because it doesn’t take up any precious space on the infographic. When space and time are both at a premium, hyperlinking can cut down on both. You can make your infographic pop and able to be easily understood quickly, while giving the person the option to expand more, should they so desire.

    Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 7:49 pm
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      That’s true! So long as you have materials to link out to, having hyperlinks can make your infograph much more like an actual resume, especially if your LinkedIn is sourced.

      Reply
  • February 17, 2016 at 5:46 pm
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    Thank you for summarizing the improvements that we talked about in class. My first infographic was lacking in visuals and overall looked way too wordy. My second one, despite re-doing the entire thing on another platform, still looks wordy but not nearly as much. It’s definitely cleaner than the original and has a lot more pics/graphics but its hard not to use too many words. I feel the need to go into detail but all the text will be a turn off for whomever is reviewing it so summarizing is a must.

    Also, I feel like Abby’s was a great example. She had a good use of graphics and a wonderful color scheme. After the test run, I feel more confident in my infographics ability to wow someone (hopefully), if not at least Ike and Russ. I have also included hyperlinks and a better timeline. My confidence in it has really improved and I hope the second time around I can achieve better results with it.

    Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 8:19 pm
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      For wordiness, try utilizing pictures to your advantage. If you are mentioning something about Facebook, put the logo next to it and remove the part that names Facebook. Also, have a friend look over it and see if there are any unnecessary additions that you could do without.

      Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 10:53 pm
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      Thanks, Alex!

      Reply
  • February 17, 2016 at 5:49 pm
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    I’m not going to lie, after hearing what Ike and Russ had to say about our infographics, I thought they had unrealistic expectations of us. This assignment was so simple, yet so challenging! I know being able to create infographics is a valuable skill, but it was challenging since this was one of the first times I have actually had to do it. While both Ike and Russ were tough on us about our first designs, I understand where they are coming from. They gave a lot of good advice on what to have on an infographic and what not to have.

    The first thing I knew I needed to change was that my infographic was very text heavy, which is not what you want to go for. I needed to create more visuals, and prove to them that my skills are valuable through date/numbers. I wasn’t very confident in my first attempt, but I believe that I am more confident making infographics going forward.

    Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 8:24 pm
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      It seems that many of us made either wordy or messy infographs. This assignment has been challenging but hopefully we will each have improved by Thursday’s class.

      Reply
  • February 17, 2016 at 11:03 pm
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    Again, great job summarizing the points that were made about fixing our infographics! Before my infographic was up for criticism, I thought that maybe I had not put enough information into it. I am glad for everyone’s feedback though, because it sounds like I was doing something right by keeping it clean and simple. A few tweaks and it should be even better tailored to the criteria.

    I saw Eli’s revised infographic and was really impressed by the degree of professionalism. There is a lot of information on it, but it looks valuable and helps tell his story and qualifications very nicely.

    Reply
    • February 17, 2016 at 11:18 pm
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      Yes, it looks like everyone agrees and thinks of yours as the best, which is awesome! Keeping it clean yet informative seems to be the goal for now, but we’ll get a chance to see how everyone did tomorrow in class.

      Reply

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